Stylish calendars

XOXO: Mark your calendars | XOXO…



Mark your diaries…

Thursday, June 2

Bearing scars they won’t let anyone see, Phoenician electric people The Senators write a manifesto declaring the objectives of “That Old War”. To which, soul singer from Sonora Carlos Arazate nods. “Sometimes I want to break glass, instead of glass breaking me.” He adds: “Democracy is ugly and broken glass is a symptom of a bigger problem that society doesn’t want to solve. At the club convention…

Early evening, balladist Salvador Duran serenades at the Congress Plaza Hotel…

The nifty, jazz guitar-focused sounds of the Matt Mitchell Threesome inaugurate the descent in the Late Night. In the Chamber of the Century…

Purveyors of blues. With ace guitarist Johnny Bloomer and Steve Jonah on the harp, porch swings offers a hard-hitting repertoire of blues, jump and swing. In Monterey court…

Opti Club: An institution of the downtown dance scene returns. alice.km and hot leather disco are behind the bridges. At the club convention…

Friday, June 3

Savage. One of the most endearing indie rock bands of their generation, Spoon come back with Lucifer on the couch (2022). An album on which the leader Britt Daniel confronts the Adversary. Not an evil Lucifer overseeing the torture in the Nine Circles of Hell, but rather a lazy Belphegor smoking a joint dissipating on the couch. “This character looking at me was really a part of me,” says Daniel Fork. “It’s that inability to move on and overcome bitterness or loneliness.” Written and recorded in Texas before and amid the pandemic, avoiding endless dubs, the album captures the sound of a band playing together in real time, creating music that feels less alone. At the Rialto Theatre…

Danger. You enter Wonk’s world. Like a locomotive on the run, the English producer of dubstep/DJ Monxx (born Josh Carling) plunges the “Wonk Train” headlong into the abyss of dubstep. At Gentle Ben…

Going far beyond their folk roots, on Too close to the Riptide (2021), Sophia Rankin and sound explore themes of love, loss, new beginnings and acceptance. At the club convention…

Interpretation of a selection of songs from The day of the great lady (2011), singer Sheryl Ann McKinley sings Billie Holiday. In the Chamber of the Century…

Next, DJ Carl Hanni spins vinyl from across the jazz spectrum well past midnight. Late night lounge…

Strains of swamp blues rock with jazz influences will float through the night air. Pilot heading south are at Monterey Court…

Saturday June 4

“Seeing ghosts, everywhere, and my life disappearing, but I’m not afraid.” One foot in the real world and the other in an enchanted dimension, neo-soul/folk singer Amos Lee comes back with Dreamland (2022). Holding up a mirror to his lifelong struggles with anxiety, isolation and fear, Lee recounts SongwriterUniverse on “Worry No More”, the first single from the album: “My depression started when I was very young. It’s his own journey. Often this can be a chronic thing. It doesn’t necessarily go away. Much of it is trying to find that door. What’s your output? It’s something different for everyone. For me, the door has always been music. At the Fox Tucson Theater…

With the release of his eponymous album in 1971, singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, David Bromberg established himself as a prodigy of American roots music. Tucson Jazz Festival Presents Quintet by David Bromberg. At the Rialto Theatre…

“The improvisational compositions meld into auditory waves of fuzz, delay and modulation and every emotion under the Sonoran desert sun.” Tucson Abstract Expressionists The Cerca commemorate A nice sweet getaway (2020), their fifth release. At the club convention…

We will not back down. Taking their name from the Egyptian sun god, nu metalists Ra formed around 1996. After years filled with trials and triumphs, the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 marked a turning point. The scale of the devastation and loss had a profound impact on leader Sahaj Ticotin. Invigorated, Ra dove headlong into the pursuit of a dream. After a fateful performance at Boston’s Nemo Fest (2002), in front of an audience of 18, fearless an enthusiast in the crowd passed on a copy of the band’s demo to famed radio personality Mistress Carrie at WKVB (107.3 FM) . The demand line lit up like Christmas. Soon after, Ra signed with Universal Music Group. At the Rock…

Performing “Phoenix 99” – originally released on 7-inch vinyl in 1987 – and two sets of material from the band’s catalog, the revered jangle-poppers of Tucson river roses are at the Saint Charles Tavern… “Here’s to you, Mrs. Robinson.” Paying homage to one of the most influential folk duos of our time, Homeward Bound: A Tribute to Simon and Garfunkel are at Gaslight Music Hall – Oro Valley…

Electronic pop producer/songwriter and LGBTQ activist shark heart unveils “How to Love”, his latest video. Earthworks…

Singer-songwriter Carra “Mamma Coal” Stasney and Alvin Blaine perform traditional country and roots music. At MotoSonora Brewing Company…

The Tucson Ambassadors of the Great Swing Era, Wholly Cats Swing Club (with singer Julie Buck) retain the music of Benny Goodman. In the Chamber of the Century…

Van Agar? Not for these guys. average streets is a tribute to David Lee Roth’s Van Halen era. At Encore…

Meaner than a pack of junk dogs. The Tirebiters (consisting of Tucson veterans Steve Grams, Gary Mackender and Lex Browning) as well as The McCallion Band (who perform original Americana and rock ‘n’ roll executed with cheerful, punk abandon) reign supreme at Monterey Court…

“Making cathartic indie pop for weirdos, outcasts, gays and anyone who needs it” castle castle make an in-store appearance to perform and sign copies of their debut album, Grow Up (2022, Kill Rock Stars). At Zia Records…

Sunday June 5

The Tucson Jazz Festival presents the legendary Alpert grass and his wife, Grammy-winning singer Lani Room performing an eclectic mix of American standards, Brazilian jazz, some Beatles, Tijuana Brass classics and songs from Brazil ’66. At the Rialto Theatre…

After the show, the Max Goldschmid Quartet host the Herb Alpert Afterparty. In the Chamber of the Century…

With decades of musical experience, these longtime Tucson musicians are igniting the embers. Southern Arizona Blues and Heritage Foundation presents Grams & Krieger. Congress kitchen. At the Congress Hotel…

A magician, who sometimes manifests as a penitent. Although this sinner’s sacrament is not mass wine, his words are distinctly confessional. Singer-songwriter Joe Pena and guitarist/pedalist Joe Novelli cause storm clouds to swell. At Che’s Lounge (patio)…

Looking for all ages, family fun? “That’s it!” DJ Herm lace up the skates, so as to slide behind the turntables, for the yacht rock edition of Spinnin’ Wheels: An outdoor disco & dance party on wheels. In the MSA appendix…

Monday, June 6

Dance with abandon. Club Whutever DJs bring some coolness to a steamy evening in Tucson. At the Tap Room Patio…

Tuesday, June 7

On Lucas Acid (2018), frontman/lyricist Chris Martinez came out as a transgender woman. The result: an album of trans anthems of unwavering ferocity with a glitch-laden industrial edge. “The biggest difference was just being able to write freely, openly and honestly,” says Martinez. “Once you get out, there’s a whole host of issues that you don’t really consider. This disc contains a lot. Pioneers of noise rap, Moodie Black are at the Club Congress…

It’s a Bluegrass Jamboree. Canyon Currents and Mount Cadillac stream traditional Applachia sounds. Just try to keep your feet from tapping. At the Gaslight Music Hall – Oro Valley…

Wrapped in flecks of blue and a strange sunburned melancholy, alt. country/popular Tammy West and the culprits bring their latest release, Little Saint (2021), to Monterey Court…

Wednesday, June 8

HuffPost references award-winning composer and multi-instrumentalist Matt Venuti as “a moving maestro”. The Ultima Zone: A full-spectrum musical, visual and sound experience. At the Solar Culture Gallery…

Honing his distinctive brand of high-octane Americana and outlaw country in the rough California honky-tonks, Mark Insley and the Broken Angels perform material from his latest album, Redemption of ten cents (2020). In Monterey court…

In memory: Al Foul (August 23, 1971 – May 25, 2022)

Beloved figure of the Tucson music scene, Al Foul (aka Alan Lewis Curtis) passed away on Wednesday, May 25, 2022, after a long battle with cancer.

Foul performed solo, as a one-man band, and as a leader of small ensembles, creating primitive folk rock, tapping into the guts of the tattered American Dream.

The musician Naïm Amor (who often played with Foul) notes: “I would say that Al is a man who really followed his dream. He built his own path, his life, his music.

As a restless young man embracing self-determination, Foul left his hometown of Boston, leaving behind his blue-collar legacy for the freedom of the road.

Eventually the “Tequila Taxi” (a beloved Chevy Bel Air) found its way to Tucson. Where he parked and stayed for a while.

In an interview with Brian Smith of Tucson Weekly, Foul said, “In a weird way, I’m living the life my dad should have lived: I was going to be a rocker. I was not going to stay in the same place. I wasn’t going to do a shitty job.

Author/singer Marianne Dissard wrote in her memoir: “I never knew Al played Wordle (maybe he did and unsurprisingly excelled at it – he had his ways with the words, one of the finest lyricists this town has ever known). I met him before the Internet. Most nights that summer I’d wander down Convent Avenue, open an old wooden door that breathed in the swampy, fragrant air, and stumble into one of Al’s bottomless nights in Barrio Viejo . Stylish down to his choice of social games, he’d hold court (for a mix of ex-con, Circle K fiends and heat-seeking outsiders), hunched over a tattered Mexican oilcloth lined with dominoes (and pieces of Rizla paper), the stakes of the ancient game fluctuating as wildly (with every knock at the door) as the pile of Schlitz in the refrigerator. Al’s domino effect.

His devoted wife, Hannah Levin, recalls: “He roared when he died at sunset last night. Not a metaphor. Like a lion. My love.”

Al Foul was 50 years old.